Fernando Gonçalves

Postdoctoral Researcher (CNPq Fellow)

Fernando Gonçalves

Deforestation and conversion of native habitats to exotic pasture and crops, in addition to inefficient agricultural and cattle management practices, are placing great pressures on natural resources in Brazilian ecosystems such as the Pantanal and Cerrado. To prevent further deforestation and protect biodiversity, areas already developed for farming and ranching need to be managed more efficiently and profitably, so that economic incentives for additional deforestation are minimized. To that end, I'm interested in furthering our understanding of the effects of livestock and land use change on plant and animal assemblages, specifically, the structure, composition and changes in functional groups and ecosystem services in the Pantanal Wetlands in Brazil. I have been working with rural community partners to promote best-management practices that optimize profitability and efficient use of developed lands, while minimizing pressures on natural resources in order to improve pasture conditions and reduce cattle impacts.

fhmg@stanford.edu

fhmgoncalves@gmail.com


Publications by Fernando Gonçalves

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Gallery by Fernando Gonçalves

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Posts by Fernando Gonçalves

BOB CAT

Assessing demography and genetic variation in Bobcat (Lynx rufus) using non-invasive DNA analysis and comparing with population size estimates obtained by camera-trapping in Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve

Research by on June 30, 2016
Felids, as mammalian carnivores in general, are inherently difficult to survey because of large home ranges, small sized populations, nocturnal activity, and wariness resulting from persecution by humans. Due to their elusive nature, wild cats are remarkably difficult to monitor and study, and thus, demographic data are often insufficient to guide appropriate conservation action or… Read more Assessing demography and genetic variation in Bobcat (Lynx rufus) using non-invasive DNA analysis and comparing with population size estimates obtained by camera-trapping in Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve
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The effects of livestock and land use change on bat communities: structure, composition and changes in functional groups and ecosystem services

Research by on March 3, 2016
The overall aim of this project is to gain a better understanding of the effects of livestock and land use change on wildlife in Pantanal Wetland, Brazil. For the historically very large properties of the Pantanal, which had a range of native pasture types and low cattle densities, the continuous grazing system was economically and environmentally… Read more The effects of livestock and land use change on bat communities: structure, composition and changes in functional groups and ecosystem services